Documents

Over the years, the JRC has produced many publications. These are found in this section. They have been sub-divided in various categories (see Subcategory buttons below). All more than 300 documents can also be inspected irrespective of the category (see 'All documents' below).

 

 

All Documents

Displaying 101 - 125 of 374 | Show 25 | 50 | All results per page.
Comparison of two landslide susceptibility assessments in the Champagne-Ardenne region (France).
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Comparison of two landslide susceptibility assessments in the Champagne-Ardenne region (France). Den Eeckhaut M.V., Marre A., Poesen J. Comparison of two landslide susceptibility assessments in the Champagne-Ardenne region (France) (2010) Geomorphology, 115 (1-2), pp. 141-155. The vineyards of the Montagne de Reims are mostly planted on steep south-oriented cuesta fronts receiving a maximum of sun radiation. Due to the location of the vineyards on steep hillslopes, the viticultural activity is threatened by slope failures. This study attempts to better understand the spatial patterns of landslide susceptibility in the Champagne–Ardenne region by comparing a heuristic (qualitative) and a statistical (quantitative) model in a 1120 km² study area. The heuristic landslide susceptibility model was adopted from the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières, the GEGEAA – Reims University and the Comité Interprofessionnel du Vin de Champagne. In this model, expert knowledge of the region was used to assign weights to all slope classes and lithologies present in the area, but the final susceptibility map was never evaluated with the location of mapped landslides. For the statistical landslide susceptibility assessment, logistic regression was applied to a dataset of 291 'old' (Holocene) landslides. The robustness of the logistic regression model was evaluated and ROC curves were used for model calibration and validation. Access the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2009.09.042 Last Update: 05/07/2011

The need for harmonizing methodologies for assessing soil threats in Europe
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

The need for harmonizing methodologies for assessing soil threats in Europe van Beek C.L., Toth T., Hagyo A., Toth G., Recatala Boix L., Ano Vidal C., Malet J.P., (...), Oenema O. The need for harmonizing methodologies for assessing soil threats in Europe (2010) Soil Use and Management, 26 (3), pp. 299-309. Central to the EU thematic strategy for soil protection is that areas affected by soil degradation through erosion, soil organic matter (SOM) decline, compaction, salinization and landslides should be identified in a clear and consistent way. However, the current methodologies to achieve this often differ and this can result in different perceptions of risks amongst EU Member States. The aims of this paper are to: (i) assess the current status of assessment methodologies in Europe (EU27) associated with erosion, SOM decline, compaction, salinization and landslides and (ii) discuss the issues associated with harmonization of these methodologies throughout the EU27. The need for harmonization is assessed using the relative share of common elements between different methodologies. The results demonstrate that the need for harmonization in methodology is greatest for erosion and compaction and least for SOM decline and landslides. However, many of the methodologies which were investigated are still incomplete and there are significant differences in terms of: (i) understanding the threats, (ii) methods of data collection, (iii) processing and interpretation and (iv) risk perception. Access the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-2743.2010.00280.x Last Update: 05/07/2011

Holistic approach to biodiversity and bioindication in soil
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Holistic approach to biodiversity and bioindication in soil To study and investigate soil biodiversity is a difficult task because of the complex interactions that exist in soil and the need for considerable expertise to undertake the necessary investigations. The factors that influence biodiversity are diverse: some are natural, for example soil acidity, water retention, temperature and organic matter content, others are anthropogenic, for example human population pressure. This report summarises the results of the multidisciplinary BIO-BIO study of biodiversity and bioindication, conducted within the Pavia Project, which had as its principal objective the evaluation of the quality and health of soil in Pavia Province, Lombardy, in northern Italy. The area under investigation covered 3000 km2 and the project took into account of the different uses of soil. Author(s): R. M. Cenci and R. J. A. Jones (eds), Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities 2009 – 43 pp, EUR23940EN – Scientific and Technical Research series – ISSN 1018-5593, ISBN 978-92-79-12793-9, DOI 10.2788/2351 Download report: (Size: 1 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 09/07/2009

An Analysis of the Land Use Sustainability Index (LUSI) at Territorial Scale Based on Corine Land Cover.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

An Analysis of the Land Use Sustainability Index (LUSI) at Territorial Scale Based on Corine Land Cover. Gardi C, Bosco C, Rusco E, Montanarella L. An Analysis of the Land Use Sustainability Index (LUSI) at Territorial Scale Based on Corine Land Cover . Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal 21 (5); 2010. p. 680-694. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology based on the use of a simple and accessible database, such as Corine Land Cover (CLC), for providing an in depth evaluation of environmental sustainability. This evaluation has been carried out through the analysis of factors such as landscape and habitat composition, the level of biodiversity, the degree of anthropisation and soil sealing and the arable land availability. Access the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14777831011067953 Last Update: 05/07/2011

Dioxins, Trace elements, Bioindicators and biodiversity in Soils
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Dioxins, Trace elements, Bioindicators and biodiversity in Soils Soils of the Province of Pavia have been the object of a biological, physical and chemical survey in order to obtain a detailed assessment of their “quality”. For this purpose, standard international methods were used to identify sampling, collection, handling and analysis points. With the use of the Land Use Cover Area from Statistical Survey (LUCAS) network, 7 Primary Points and 34 Secondary Points have been identified. On the basis of the same network, 116 sampling points (Tertiary Points) have been selected within six areas of prevalently industrial nature. The bio-physical-chemical analyses of all the soil samples were the following: trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti and Zn), macro elements (C tot, Corg, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, N, Na, P and Si), dioxins and furans, pH, water retention, pedological profile, bacteria Authors: R. M. Cenci, F. Sena, Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities 2009 – 192 pp, EUR23935EN– Scientific and Technical Research series – ISSN 1018-5593, ISBN 978-92-79-12793-9, DOI 10.2788/2351 Download report: (Size: 12 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 09/07/2009

Soil Biodiversity Monitoring in Europe: Ongoing Activities and Challenges.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Soil Biodiversity Monitoring in Europe: Ongoing Activities and Challenges. Gardi C, Montanarella L. Soil Biodiversity Monitoring in Europe: Ongoing Activities and Challenges. European Journal of Soil Science, Volume 60 Issue 5, Pages 807 - 819, 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2389.2009.01177.x The increasing interest in soil biodiversity and its protection, has twofold aspects: the per se biodiversity conservation issues and the mostly unknown economical values of the services provided by soil biodiversity. Inventory and monitoring are the necessary tools for the achievement of an adequate level of knowledge on soil biodiversity status and for the detection of hot spot as well as areas subject to decline. In this paper the main tools and methodological approaches for soil biodiversity measurement are presented, as well as the technical aspects related to the inventory and monitoring activities at large spatial scale. Technical aspects related to the inventory and monitoring activities at a large spatial scale are discussed. A short review of some current experiences of soil biodiversity monitoring at the European level is also presented. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Climate change: soil can make a difference!
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Climate change: soil can make a difference! Climate is a principle factor of soil development. Climate drives major soil-forming processes including transformation, accumulation and transport of substances that result in the diversity of soil types on the Earth. Soil is one of the key life support systems responsible for the performance of major ecological functions such as biomass production in agriculture and forestry, storing, fi ltering and transforming nutrients, substances and water, biodiversity (e.g. habitats, species and genes), physical and cultural environment for humans and human activities, source of raw materials, etc. The change of climate alters all processes in soil which may have serious consequences for the both environment and society. Therefore, climate-soil relationship is one of the priority topics in soil science. This booklet presents an overview of the various activities which are being carried out by the Soil Action or to which the basic soil data were provided. In addition, new methods to verify the changes of the organic carbon and estimate the potentials of carbon change in the EU mineral soils are introduced. The overall goal of the document is to provide examples that clearly illustrate that soil is an important issue in climate change. Policies and strategies supporting the effective management of soil can really make a difference for the mitigation of climate change. Vladimir Stolbovoy, Brechje Maréchal, Arwyn Jones, Ezio Rusco and Luca Montanarella, 2008. Conference on ‘Climate change - can soil make a difference?’ , 12th June 2008 , Centre Borschette, Brussels Download report: (Size: 13 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 30/06/2009

Soils, Society & Global Change
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Soils, Society & Global Change This book highlights how our ability to manage soils plays an important role in global challenges such as climate change, biodiversity reduction, food and water security, and economic and social progress. It explores policy and legal challenges, knowledge management issues, and the crucial role of soil in the successful implementation of the global environmental conventions. The book concludes with the Programme for Action which includes a number of proactive recommendations on how global policies can be improved to protect soil as a resource. The context for this book is the 2007 centennial celebrations of organized conservation and restoration of soil and vegetation in Iceland. As Europe’s northernmost nation, Iceland historically suffered acute land degradation problems and through a century of perseverance has now become a world leader in soil restoration research and techniques. A number of international partners and world-class experts on a variety of pertinent fields gathered in Selfoss, Iceland to join in an International Forum. This book outlines the groundbreaking ideas developed by these experts to address the global soil problems and innovative ways to address the combined challenges of soil, society and global change. Proceedings of the International Forum Celebrating the Centenary of Conservation and Restoration of Soil and Vegetation in Iceland Edited by Harriet Bigas, Gudmundur Ingi Gudbrandsson, Luca Montanarella and Andrés Arnalds. European Communities, pp 212, 2009. JRC50243, EUR 23784 EN, Catalogue number: LB-NA-23784-EN-C , ISSN: 1018-5593, ISBN 978-92-79-11775-6, DOI: 10.2788/84964 Download report: (Size: 10 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 30/06/2009

Data Management for Monitoring Forest Soils in Europe for the Biosoil Project.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Data Management for Monitoring Forest Soils in Europe for the Biosoil Project. Lacarce E, Le Bas C, Cousin J, Pesty B, Toutain B, Durrant T, Montanarella L. Data Management for Monitoring Forest Soils in Europe for the Biosoil Project. Soil Use and Management, Volume 25 Issue 1, Pages 57 - 65, 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-2743.2009.00194.x Growing environmental awareness and advances in modelling have generated interest in soil monitoring networks. Data management tools have to be developed in order to store data, check for errors and retrieve data for sharing and for analysis. As a result, we have designed a web application and a database for the Biosoil project that focuses on European forest soils. Integral to the system are authentication of users and access rights to the modules and data. It also logs all activities of each user. During data submission, the system automatically manages data transfer from the flat file (ASCII file) to the database after compliance checks. Then error tracking is followed by automated expert checks. These checks identify potential mistakes that can be corrected or commented on by data providers. Since the quality of the results obtained from analysing the data can only be as good as the data, proper management practices should be considered at all stages of the monitoring activity, if the value of the information is to be properly exploited. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Development of a Spatial European Soil Property Data Set
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Development of a Spatial European Soil Property Data Set For many applications of modelling environmental conditions or developing scenarios for environmental change analysis soil property data in form of spatial layers are needed. Raster data formats are widely used for the modelling of movements through space and the storage of parameters, which change constantly and without a pattern that could be described by a plain mathematical function. This study into providing spatial soil property layers uses a soil database where the soil properties are stored in tables of generalized combinations of attributes and linked to a spatial layer of delineated mapping units. Roland Hiederer & Robert J.A. Jones, 2009. Development of a Spatial European Soil Property Data Set. JRC Scientific and Technical Report EUR 23839 EN, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg, 30 pp.ISBN 978-92-79-12535-5, ISSN 1018-5593 , DOI 10.2788/19220. Download report: (Size: 1 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 19/06/2009

The spectral quality of light influences the temporal development of the microbial phenotype at the arable soil surface.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

The spectral quality of light influences the temporal development of the microbial phenotype at the arable soil surface. Jeffery S, Harris J, Rickson J, Ritz K. The Spectral Quality of Light Influences the Temporal Development of the Microbial Phenotype at the Arable Soil Surface. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Volume 41, Issue 3, March 2009, Pages 553-560 , doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2008.12.014 The uppermost zone of soil represents the primary interface between the above- and below-ground compartments of terrestrial ecosystems and is functionally important since it affects water infiltration, gaseous exchange, erosion processes and the habitat for surface and near-surface dwelling fauna. Two microcosm-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the development of microbial communities in the uppermost centimetre of an arable soil surface following a physical disturbance event, and to determine the effects of the spectral wavebands of light upon such development. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Tolerable Versus Actual Soil Erosion Rates in Europe.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Tolerable Versus Actual Soil Erosion Rates in Europe. Verheijen F, Jones R, Rickson J, Smith C. Tolerable Versus Actual Soil Erosion Rates in Europe. Earth-Science Reviews, Volume 94, Issues 1-4, May 2009, Pages 23-38 , doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2009.02.003 Erosion is a major threat to soil resources in Europe, and may impair their ability to deliver a range of ecosystem goods and services. This is reflected by the European Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which recommends an indicator-based approach for monitoring soil erosion. Defined baseline and threshold values are essential for the evaluation of soil monitoring data. Therefore, accurate spatial data on both soil loss and soil genesis are required, especially in the light of predicted changes in climate patterns, notably frequency, seasonal distribution and intensity of precipitation. Rates of soil loss have been measured, modelled or inferred for most types of soil erosion in a variety of landscapes, by studies across the spectrum of the Earth sciences. This paper reviews the concept of tolerable soil erosion and summarises current knowledge on rates of soil formation, which are then compared to rates of soil erosion by known erosion types, for assessment of soil erosion monitoring at the European scale. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

ENVASSO: ENVironmental ASsessment of Soil for mOnitoring.
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

ENVASSO: ENVironmental ASsessment of Soil for mOnitoring. The project's main objective was to define and document a soil monitoring system for implementation in support of a Soil Framework Directive, aimed at protecting soil in the EU. The final reports from the ENVASSO project can be downloaded through the following links: Volume I identifies 290 potential indicators relating to 188 key issues for nine threats to soil identified in the Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. Volume IIa identifies the existing soil inventory and monitoring systems in the EU Member States and evaluates the extent to which existing soil monitoring networks adequately represent European soil typological units, land use/cover, specific soil criteria - such as soil organic carbon, bulk density, heavy metal contents - and existing spatial assessments of threats to soil such as soil erosion, compaction and desertification. Volume IIb is a Survey of National Soil Monitoring Networks, containing comprehensive fact sheets listing for each national network, its purpose, the sampling strategy adopted, the analytical methods used and the number of monitoring sites. Volume III reviews user-needs for soil information and briefly describes existing soil information systems in a selection of Member States. Volume IVa summarises the results of testing 22 indicator procedures in 28 Pilot Areas in the Member Sates. (Oct 2009) Volume IVb contains 28 Pilot Area study reports that adhere to a standard reporting template to aid comparison and evaluation. They represent a wide range of soil-landscapes from the north to the south of Europe........ Volume V describes the procedures and protocols needed for harmonised soil monitoring in Europe which have been modified following the extensive testing of 22 indicators in 28 Pilot Areas of EU Member States reported in Volume IV. Volume VI summarises the results presented in the preceding volumes (I-V) and concludes with a proposed approach to monitoring soil conditions in Europe. Last Update: 30/10/2009

Applying quality assurance procedures to environmental monitoring data: a case study
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Applying quality assurance procedures to environmental monitoring data: a case study Durrant T, Hiederer R., Applying quality assurance procedures to environmental monitoring data: a case study, Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 2009, 11, 774 - 781, DOI: 10.1039/b818274b Managing data in the context of environmental monitoring is associated with a number of particular difficulties. These can be broadly split into issues originating from the inherent heterogeneity of the parameters sampled, problems related to the long time scale of most monitoring programmes and situations that arise when attempting to maximise cost-effectiveness. The complexity of environmental systems is reflected in the considerable effort and cost required to collect good quality data describing the influencing factors that can improve our understanding of the interrelationships and allow us to draw conclusions about how changes will affect the systems. The resulting information is also frequently elaborate, costly and irreplaceable. Since the quality of the results obtained from analysing the data can only be as good as the data, proper management practices should be considered at all stages of the monitoring activity, if the value of the information is to be properly exploited. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Landslide Mapping in Austria.
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Landslide Mapping in Austria. This study presents and discusses landslide inventories, susceptibility and hazard maps and databases available in Austria. Schweigl, J., Hervás, J., 2009. Landslide Mapping in Austria. JRC Scientific and Technical Report EUR 23785 EN, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg, 61 pp. ISBN 978-92-79-11776-3. Download report: (Size: 26 MB) Preview FrontPage : Last Update: 07/04/2009

Sustainable mineral resources management: from regional mineral resources exploration to spatial contamination risk assessment of mining.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Sustainable mineral resources management: from regional mineral resources exploration to spatial contamination risk assessment of mining. Gyozo Jordan and JRC PECOMINES Project (Giovanni Bidoglio, Marco D'Alessandro, Tamas Hamor, Stefan Sommer, Panos Panagos, Marc van Liederkerke, Anca-Marina Vijdea), Environmental Geology, Springer Berlin , ISSN 0943-0105, Issue Volume 58, Number 1 / July, 2009, pp 153-169, DOI 10.1007/s00254-008-1502-y. Wide-spread environmental contamination associated with historic mining in Europe has triggered social responses to improve related environmental legislation, the environmental assessment and management methods for the mining industry. The objective of this paper is to show how regional mineral resources mapping has developed into the spatial contamination risk assessment of mining and how geological knowledge can be transferred to environmental assessment of mines. The paper provides a state-of-the-art review of the spatial mine inventory, hazard, impact and risk assessment and ranking methods developed by national and international efforts in Europe. It is concluded that geological knowledge on mineral resources exploration is essential and should be used for the environmental contamination assessment of mines. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Review of existing information on the interrelations between soil and climate change (CLIMSOIL)
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Review of existing information on the interrelations between soil and climate change (CLIMSOIL) Climate change poses a number of threats to soils in Europe. As a follow-up to the high-level June 2008 conference on soil and climate change a group of European scientists were asked by the Commission to assess the contribution soils can make to climate change mitigation and the effect of climate change on soil productivity and organic matter depletion. The objective of the CLIMSOIL study is to provide a more complete understanding of the link between soil under different land uses and climate change through a comprehensive literature review and expert contributions. The CLIMSOIL report (December 2008): Full CLIMSOIL Report Key Messages & Executive Summary Table of Contents Press release on the report on existing information between soil and climate change (March 2009)

Addressing soil degradation in EU agriculture: relevant processes, practices and policies.
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Addressing soil degradation in EU agriculture: relevant processes, practices and policies. Agriculture occupies a substantial proportion of the European land, and consequently plays an important role in maintaining natural resources and cultural landscapes, a precondition for other human activities in rural areas. Unsustainable farming practices and land use, including mismanaged intensification as well as land abandonment, have an adverse impact on natural resources. Having recognised the environmental challenges of agricultural land use, the European Parliament requested the European Commission in 2007 to carry out a pilot project on 'Sustainable Agriculture and Soil Conservation through simplified cultivation techniques' (SoCo). The project originated from a close cooperation between the Directorate-General for Agriculture and Rural Development (DG AGRI) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC). It was implemented by the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) and the Institute for Environment and Sustainability (IES). Report on the project 'Sustainable Agriculture and Soil Conservation (SoCo)'.Authors: SoCo Project Team, Editors: Geertrui Louwagie, Stephan Hubertus Gay, Alison Burrell. EUR 23767 EN, ISSN 1018-5593, Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2009. Download report: (Size: 4 MB) , Download the Annex (14 MB) Preview FrontPage :

Basin characteristics and nutrient losses: the EUROHARP catchment network perspective.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Basin characteristics and nutrient losses: the EUROHARP catchment network perspective. F. Bouraoui, B. Grizzetti, G. Adelsköld, H. Behrendt, I. de Miguel, M. Silgram, S. Gómez, K. Granlund, L. Hoffmann, B. Kronvang, S. Kværnø, A. Lázár, M. Mimikou, G. Passarella, P. Panagos, H. Reisser, B. Schwarzl, C. Siderius, A. S. Sileika, A. A. M. F. R. Smit, R. Sugrue, M. VanLiedekerke and J. Zaloudik. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 2009, 11, 515 - 525, DOI: 10.1039/b822931g The EC-funded EUROHARP project studies the harmonisation of modelling tools to quantify nutrient losses from diffuse sources. This paper describes a set of study areas used in the project from geographical conditions, to land use and land management, geological and hydro-geological perspectives. The status of data availability throughout Europe in relation to the modelling requirements is presented. The relationships between the catchment characteristics and the nutrient export are investigated, using simple data available for all the catchments. In addition, this study also analyses the hydrological representativity of the time series utilised in the EUROHARP project. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Soil Biodiversity
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Soil Biodiversity What is biodiversity? Biodiversity has different meanings depending on the situation being discussed and the target audience. For example, the Oxford English Dictionary defines biodiversity as being. The variety of plant and animal life in the world or in a particular habitat. This is definition is clearly sufficient for non-specialists. However, when looking more specifically at biodiversity, it becomes evident that thought needs to be given to other groups such as fungi, bacteria and archea. As soil is such as diverse system when considered biologically (as well as physically or chemically) it is necessary to include all taxonomic groups. Therefore, throughout this booklet, when referring to soil biodiversity it will be in reference to the variety of all living organisms found within the soil system. Ciro Gardi and Simon Jeffery EUR23759EN, ISBN 978-92-79-11289-8, ISSN 1018-5593, DOI 10.2788/7831 , Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2009. Download report: (Size: 4 MB) Preview FrontPage :

Soil Erosion in the Alpine Area: Risk Assessment and Climate Change.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Soil Erosion in the Alpine Area: Risk Assessment and Climate Change. Bosco C, Rusco E, Montanarella L, Panagos P. Soil Erosion in the Alpine Area: Risk Assessment and Climate Change. Studi Trentini di Scienze Naturali 85; 2009. p. 117-123 Objective of the research is to define the magnitude of the Actual Soil Erosion Risk in the alpine area and linked it with a perspective of medium long terms in relation to climate change. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was applied to the whole alpine space. It allowed to produce, with a spatial resolution of 100 m, the map of actual soil erosion and two further maps defining soil erosion rates in IPCC A2 and B2 scenarios. This analysis was carried out by means of the dataset the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) of Trieste made us available. It provides daily rainfall values for the years 1960 - 1990 and for the IPCC A2 and B2 scenario 2070 - 2100. From a comparison between actual erosion and soil losses in A2 and B2 scenarios it comes out that our model does not show relevant raises in erosion rates. Download the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Designation of Local Varieties in the Hungarian Soil Classification System: Remarks from a Viewpoint of Land Evaluation Application.
Resource Type: Publications in Journals, Documents, Maps & Documents

Designation of Local Varieties in the Hungarian Soil Classification System: Remarks from a Viewpoint of Land Evaluation Application. Toth G, Mako A, Mate F. Designation of Local Varieties in the Hungarian Soil Classification System: Remarks from a Viewpoint of Land Evaluation Application. ISSN 1064-2293, Eurasian Soil Science, 2009, Vol. 42, No. 13, pp. 1448–1453. Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2009. This paper examines the information transfer of soil taxonomic classification units of the Hungarian soil classification from the viewpoint of land productivity evaluation applications. For this purpose statistical analyses of a national soil and plant production database (with 80000 entries) have been applied. Results show that soil groupings both in taxonomic and productivity classifications may be incorrect in some cases. Taxonomic misclassification can occur at higher levels of soil classification. With only the general purpose classification of soil characteristics in lower level taxonomic units major interpretive information loss can occur. Access the paper Last Update: 26/04/2010

Bioindicatori per valutare la qualità dei suoli di alcuni parchi della città di Roma
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Bioindicatori per valutare la qualità dei suoli di alcuni parchi della città di Roma Il presente studio è stato effettuato alfine di stimare parte della qualità ambientale in alcuni parchi della città di Roma. Per tale indagine sono stati utilizzati muschi, suoli superficiali raccolti nei parchi di Villa Borghese, Villa Ada e Villa Doria Pamphili. Queste aree sono state scelte perché adiacenti a strade ad alto traffico veicolare. Complessivamente sono state approntate 11 stazioni di prelievo. R. M. Cenci, D. Dabergami, E. Beccaloni, G. Ziemacki, A. Benedetti, L. Pompili, A. S. Mellina, M. Bianchi EUR 23567 IT, Catalogue number LB-NA-23567-IT-C, ISSN 1018-5593, ISBN: 978-92-79-10648-4 Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities , 2008. Download report: (Size: 1 MB) Preview FrontPage :

Threats to Soil Quality in Europe
Resource Type: Scientific-Technical Reports

Threats to Soil Quality in Europe The special session during EUROSOIL 2008 dedicated to the threats to soil quality in Europe has allowed for an indepth analysis of the status of research in this are and the identification of still existing research gaps for future action. The full coverage of the threats identified within the Soil Thematic Strategy will allow to further support the on-going process towards better soil protection in Europe. Gergely Tóth, Luca Montanarella and Ezio Rusco (eds.) EUR 23438 EN, ISBN 978-92-79-09529-0, ISSN 1018-5593, DOI 10.2788/8647 . Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities , 2008. Download report: (Size: 8MB) Preview FrontPage :

Elementi chimici nei funghi superiori
Resource Type: Various Documents, Documents, Maps & Documents

Elementi chimici nei funghi superiori R. M. CENCI, L. COCCHI, O. PETRINI, F. SENA, C. SINISCALCO, L. VESCOVI I funghi in natura sono tra i principali agenti dei cicli biogeochimici, i cicli di materia ed energia alla base del funzionamento degli ecosistemi. Le informazioni relative alla biodiversita delle specie fungine italiane e l'utilizzo dei valori di concentrazione di elementi chimici nei medesimi potrebbero permettere di usare i funghi quali indicatori biologici della qualita di ambienti forestali, boschivi e semi naturali. L'archivio dati dell'EUR Report raccoglie le concentrazioni, su materiale secco, di 35 elementi chimici, metalli pesanti compresi, per oltre 9.000 campioni di funghi superiori che rappresentano circa 200 generi e un migliaio di specie. Il raggiungimento della stabilita statistica dell'archivio ha consentito di definire il concetto di "fungo di riferimento". L'uso del "fungo di riferimento" potrebbe essere importante, anche solo come approccio metodologico, in vari campi della ricerca micologica e ambientale; dalla biodiversita e bioindicazione, alla tassonomia fino all'impatto igienico sanitario. Updated: 11/02/2011 , Download the Book.