School Material

Soil "goes" to schools and students. 30 Images designed by students aged from 8 to 14 during the JRC Open Day, 16 May 2009.

The Education sector : By introducing soil science into the school curriculum from an early age it is possible to use ‘hands-on’ activities to explore and explain basic soil characteristics and functions such as: the different textures soil have - feel tests; what organisms live in soils - microscope work to study soil bugs and animals; soils in the garden - composting and growing plants. Soil biodiversity from a different point of view. A child’s eye view of life below ground. It is interesting to note the variety of organisms and that the child has drawn a yellow figure with their entire body ‘suspended’ by their feet in the soil!

 

soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Soil everywhere is home to an abundance of various insects of all shapes and sizes. Diversity abounds even where you least expect it! 
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

The daily activities of the average worm. Watch out for those birds!
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

A common worm encounter under the surface.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

It's a mole's life down under all that dirt. One of the many animals that live in the soil apart from many insects. 
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Mole vs. Worm. Who will survive the longest underneath the surface?
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Worms may also be found above the surface from time to time. Be careful not to step on them! They are what make the soil nice and soft for plants to grow in.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

A family of worms working their way through the soil, making it ready for plants to grow in.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Time to relax after all that hard work. Must be comfortable for him.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Looks like he's happy to be above the surface. 
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

That ant looks hungry! The centipede may end up as its next meal.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Who's that fella there? And he seems to have a friend as well.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Here's another happy worm, ready for his next job under all that soil.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Even underground critters must have some sense of road safety.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Worms above the ground. Wonder what they are looking for.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Some different types of soil that worm is digging through.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Best friends exist even in the environment surrounding us.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

On a mission for food. Where is this worm going, I wonder?
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Even worms have got to work during the summer, converting all that dirt into fruitful soil for plant life.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Digging a tunnel underneath the surface. Hope it doesn't collapse with those rocks above! 
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Taking some time off for a nice long nap. It must be hard being a mole.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

There can be more than just moles, worms, and ants under the soil. You may be surprised by what is hiding under all that dirt! 
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

In some areas, the conditions even for soil dwellers can be fairly harsh.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Mountainous regions also have soil, though as one climbs higher, there may be less and less.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

There are even many-legged animalia within the soil. It really is a very unique and interesting place to be.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

This litter guy has established his own niche in his environment. Lots of protection by tree roots here.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Worm attack! Thankfully, a worm is fairly harmless, even to fellow insects because of what it eats, that being dirt.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Worms and moles are only two of many species found underneath the surface.
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Busily working down under. Good soil means better plant life!
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

Slugs are actually predators of earthworms. Hope that worm realises just what danger he's got himself into!
soil 
[PDF]        [JPEG]

There are actually many types of earthworm. Don't be surprised to find worms that look different that ones that you see more often.

Acknowledgement: Daniel Sampson, Student of the European School, Varese, Italy (for his contribution in Awareness Raising Material).